Mary Cummins Animal Advocates Los Angeles California Wildlife Rehabilitation Real Estate

Mary Cummins Animal Advocates Los Angeles California Wildlife Rehabilitation Real Estate
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Sunday, February 25, 2024

Oppose Virginia Bill HB 1354 Unless Amended - Current Amendment is Harmful to All - Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates

OPPOSITION TO VIRGINIA BILL 1354 UNLESS AMENDED

to DelMMartinez, delishin, delhseibold, senatorroem, senatorstanley, senatorboysko, senatorperry, senatorsubramanyam, senatormarsden, senatorfavola, senatorfrench, senatorhackworth, senatorhashmi, senatormulchi, senatorobenshain, senatorpekarsky, senatorsalim, senatorstuart, senatorsuetterlein, senatorwilliamsgraves, info@pawproject, Info@animaladvocates

Animal Advocates has been involved with anti cat declaw for over 20 years. We've worked with The Paw Project during that time to educate the public about how harmful declawing a cat is for humans, animal shelters, veterinarians and cats. The current version is misguided and not based on facts or science, see below. Please, oppose or amend bill HB 1354.

"The current version of the bill, as a result of amendments from the Virginia Veterinary Medical Association, allow any cat to be declawed if the cat’s owner obtains a note from a physician stating that scratches from the cat would pose a health risk for the owner. The bill would reinforce the false idea among human medical doctors that cat scratches are a legitimate human health concern and reason for declawing.

In should be noted that NO human health authority recommends declawing to protect human health. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the United States Public Health Service (USPHS), and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) have gone on record saying that declawing cats is not advised to protect human health. Neither the National Hemophilia Foundation nor the American Cancer Society recommend declawing to protect human patients. The American Association of Feline Practitioners, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, and the American Animal Hospital Association agree and cite these human health authority opinions.

This bill would make physicians unwitting collaborators in giving credibility to the premise that declawing can benefit human health. Between uninformed doctors and doctors willing to sign anything to get annoying patients out of their offices quickly, there will still be a loophole. It would also constitute a liability risk to the physicians (and veterinarians) since declawed cats have been proven more likely to bite than non-declawed cats, and bites are a more serious health concern than scratches.

Veterinarians who don't want to declaw will feel pressured by clients who come to their offices with a doctor's note. Veterinarians will find it difficult to say no to a physician’s prescription. Real bans, like the ones in New York and Maryland, help veterinarians who don't want the stress of arguing with a client about declawing. The veterinary profession has a high suicide rate, and this added stress is the kind of thing that contributes to it."

--
Mary Cummins
President
Animal Advocates
www.AnimalAdvocates.us
www.facebook.com/AnimalAdvocatesUSA

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Thursday, January 11, 2024

Overgrown Embedded Roller Blade Claws in Cats, Felines by Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates

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Cats claws or nails grow continually during their lives just like our finger and toe nails. We trim our nails with nail clippers or files. Cats in the wild will scratch on trees to keep their nails in check. Indoor cats will scratch on rugs, cat trees or the sofa to keep their nails in check. 

Our nails grow continually in a single layered nail. Cats nails grow differently with multiple layers and sheaths. The outer layer or sheath is generally shed when they scratch on cat trees. You will find nail sheaths stuck on the cat tree or around the base. They look like the below photo, like splintered bits of nails or may even look like an entire nail. 

If cats are older, sick, disabled, have arthritis, they sometimes stop using cat trees. The sheaths are not removed and build it. As the nail continues to grow the full nail will curl around and embed into the paws or legs if it's a dew claw. Dew claws are the most likely to be overgrown. The front claws grow faster and longer than the rear claws. Front claws are more likely to be overgrown. Below are photos of embedded claws, nails. First three are front dew claws. All of these cats were very old and not scratching on anything because of their age.

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If your cat has embedded claws, see a veterinarian. If you are a veterinarian or vet technician, you can trim them yourself. First time I saw this I took the cat to the vet. He forgot to trim them. I realized this when I got him and he told me to trim them myself which I did. Still, we are not veterinarians and are not giving veterinary advice. If your cat was declawed and claws regrew under the skin and maybe poke out a little, see a cat declaw repair, claw specialist veterinarian only. Never try to trim or remove those as they must be removed by surgery after xrays. It's not just the claw growing under there but the leftover amputated bone, nail and nail cells. There's generally also lots of infection and scar tissue which must also be removed. Contact thepawproject.com for declaw repair specialists.

Make sure you never trim into the quick which is the pink area which is the blood supply to the nail bed. It will cause pain, bleeding and your cat will never allow you to trim their nails again. We trim an area away from the nail bed and away from the quick closer to where the natural nail tip end would be. We also trim within 1/8 " from where the nail is entering the paw pad or skin. See photo below. Remove that little section which generally falls off. Then we slowly remove the embedded section gently in a curved motion similar to the opposite direction in which it grew into the paw. If it doesn't come out super easy, if it bleeds, if it hurts the cat, let an experienced cat claw vet do it. It should just fall out. 



After you've removed the embedded part go back and trim the nail to the proper length making sure you don't clip the quick. If you can't see the quick because of sheath overgrowth making it too thick, you can use tweezers to gently pull off the dead outer layers of nail sheaths. Below are photos of some removed embedded and overgrown nails. The top ones were more deeply embedded. They just fell out of the paw when the first section, arc was removed. The force of the nail is what's keeping them in the skin. They did not bleed at all.


In order to prevent embedded claws trim your older cats nails once a month or so. At least check the nails once a month. Always provide cat scratching trees, mats, toys. 






Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


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Sunday, January 7, 2024

Number of California Mountain Lions Only 3,200-4,500 by Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates

Photo from Wikipedia

I've written extensively about the dwindling number of mountain lions in California especially in Southern California. Most of the mountain lions who die in Southern California die because of humans. They are mainly killed being hit by cars, poisoned with rat poison or with depredation permits. 

When asked about the number of mountain lions in California the California Department of Fish & Wildlife generally says they have no idea how many exist. They never really tried to find out because they knew their numbers were decreasing rapidly. They allegedly told some the number "could be" about 6,000. 

I had estimated the number was closer to 4,000 in an article I wrote about depredation permits.  I stated "the California Department of Fish & Wildlife gave depredation permits to people in California who killed 1,702 mountain lions from 2001 to 2018" based on the results of State Information Act Requests which I made. Depredation permits are given to people who have had pets or livestock killed by mountain lions. The permits allow them to shoot and kill the mountain lion whom they think killed their animals. Every time pets or livestock are killed it's because they weren't properly protected by their owners.

Today the LA Times had an article about a recent study which is not final or published about the actual number of mountain lions in the state. The study found there could be 3,200-4,500 mountain lions in the state with most in Northern California. My estimate was right in the middle even though Fish & Wildlife told me it was "way too low." I even asked people who were directly involved in this study if they knew how many mountain lions existed. They said they had no idea but my number was too low. I actually have that on video. From the article,

"The total number of mountain lions is estimated to be between 3,200 and 4,500, which is thousands fewer than previously thought. The count was conducted by state and university scientists who used GPS collar data and genetic information from scat samples to model population densities across the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Mojave Desert and Southern California’s patchwork of weedy, fire-stripped wilderness.

“The greatest density is in the coastal forests of Humboldt and Mendocino counties of Northwest California, and lowest is the high desert east of the Sierra Nevada range in Inyo County,” said Justin Dellinger, a large-carnivore biologist and leader of the California Mountain Lion Project effort. “The Central Valley and portions of the Mojave Desert have no mountain lions.”

"The California Department of Fish and Wildlife had for decades estimated that the state’s mountain lion population was roughly 6,000 — even despite relentless vehicle strikes, wildfires and encroachment by land-hungry humans throughout their range.

“That old figure was just a back-of-the-envelope calculation without much data to support it,” Dellinger said. “The new, more accurate information we collected will be used to conserve and manage mountain lions more appropriately.”

In a collaborative effort involving the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, UC Davis, UC Santa Cruz, the nonprofit Institute for Wildlife Studies and the nonprofit Audubon Canyon Ranch, Dellinger and others traipsed through mountain forests, canyons and desert badlands in search of tracks. They also set trail cameras and traps, tranquilized lions, took biological samples and fitted animals with tracking collars.

Dellinger said the group spent roughly $2.45 million in state funds over seven years to produce three population estimates: One suggests there are 4,511 cougars living in California, and the other two suggest the number is roughly 3,200. Deciding which figure is most precise will be challenging for biologists tasked with reviewing the census report."

"There’s an almost 1 in 4 chance that the charismatic cats could be extinct in the Santa Monica and Santa Ana Mountains within 50 years."

Clearly something must be done now or our native mountain lion will become extinct. I'm sure they calculated the birth rate, cub/kitten survival rate to age of maturity/breeding and death rate by various causes including depredation permits to make this estimate. I'd love to see the math but will have to wait until the research is reviewed then published. I will assume it's correct based on my knowledge of the experience and expertise of Dr. T Winston Vickers, UC Davis and the other organizations involved.

As I stated in my previous articles the main things we must do to save native mountain lions in order are the following.

1. Do not give any depredation permits for mountain lions. People must secure their livestock and pets. If a mountain lion doesn't kill and eat the livestock or pet dog, a coyote will. Fish & Wildlife said they don't want to give the permits. Ask the California legislature or the Fish & Game Commission to change the regulations that makes it mandatory for the Department to give depredation permits. They should only give permits if one specific mountain lion is a definite threat to humans based on facts and physical evidence.

2. Stop allowing the use of anticoagulant bait poison outdoors. Non-target wildlife are eating the poison directly or they are being poisoned secondarily by eating animals which ate the poison. Mountain lions will eat slower sick animals more often because they're easier to catch. They primarily eat the organ meat which is where the poison is stored in the liver. Mountain lions eat coyotes, raccoons who are also poisoned secondarily. Mountain lions eat ground squirrels, gophers directly who eat the poison directly. They really need to find a different safer method of controlling ground squirrels, gophers on golf courses, soccer fields and landscape areas. They have to put the poison in bait stations which only allow the target animal. Maybe there can be trap doors in the bait stations that dump the animal in a bucket where it can at least be killed humanely and quickly. Poison is a slow painful death.

3. Allow the maintenance of existing open space. Limit development and plan any development with native wildlife in mind. Don't plan new freeways with blind curves. Research has shown us mountain lions are more likely to be hit by cars on curved roads with limited visibility. If mountain lions must pass through a dangerous area, guide and funnel them to safer areas with hardscape and landscape. They are incorporating some of this in the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing. Development also limits population ranges which isolates mountain lions causing inbreeding and genetic degradation issues.

I'm glad someone finally did a study about the actual number of mountain lions in California. Maybe this will help conserve this important keystone species. We need mountain lions to help control the deer population. If the deer population gets out of control, it can be detrimental to our ecosystem and environment. This is especially so because we killed off all our native wolves over 100 years ago. Only recently have a few migrated from other states into California. Reintroducing wolves in certain areas in some states has restored ecosystems. I hope we don't get to the point where we have to reintroduce mountain lions to California. 

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Monday, January 1, 2024

The Undetectables on Discovery Channel featuring Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates


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Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates was on the fourth episode of Discovery Channel's "The Unetectables." Cummins educated the public about squirrels and why they should not be kept as pets. July 27, 2005.

THE UNDETECTABLES

“We’re here to save you from your home”

THE UNDETECTABLES – Premieres on Discovery Channel
The Real Animal House, Monday, July 25 at 4:00 PM ET/PT
Little House of Horrors, Tuesday, July 26 at 4:00 PM ET/PT
Saving Dad, Wednesday, July 27 at 4:00 PM ET/PT
Superheroes of the Gross, Thursday, July 28 at 4:00 PM ET/PT

Visit the Undetectables website for more info!

Every home has a secret. Under the floors, behind the bedroom walls, there is an alien place, populated by millions of creatures–some bizarre… some disgusting… some downright lethal! Welcome to the world of Discovery Channel’s new limited series, THE UNDETECTABLES, premiering March 1 at 8:00 PM ET/PT. In four fast-paced episodes, airing Tuesdays throughout the month, the ground-breaking program uncovers the microscopic and unseen world–everything you were afraid to find out that lives in your home–from germs to bacteria, from salmonella to toxic mold… not to mention the bugs.

Half reality show, half “Fantastic Voyage,” the series employs a dynamic SWAT team for the invisible world – five experts who are charged with seeking out the dangers of a microbial realm that exists right inside our homes. They’ve been called “the Superheroes of the Gross”: PJ Aspuria, the microbiologist; Steve Sandalis, the contractor; Dr. Marc Reidl, specialist in allergens and immunology; Chris Hardie, pest expert; and mold specialist Rich Valdez. Swabbing and testing every room and surface, they use the latest in high-tech gadgetry–from thermal scanners, to the Crimescope forensic light… plus the unparalleled computer graphics of Zoic Studios (the company that creates the special effects for the hit series CSI: Miami).

Investigating from the basement to the rafters, the high-energy experts give home invasions a whole new meaning… From a 100-year-old Arts-and-Crafts Bungalow to a college frat house, THE UNDETECTABLES reveal to the unsuspecting residents the home they never dreamed was there – their real home. Did you know…

That there are 200 times more fecal bacteria on the average person’s cutting board than their toilet seat. In many case, they’d do better to make their sandwiches on top of the toilet seat.
Dust in our homes can be made of up to 80% dust mites- microscopic creatures that feed on the more than one million skin cells we shed each hour.
That every time you flush the toilet, it’s an eruption of microbes… sending a shower of microscopic particles up to 20 feet away… and coating the entire bathroom…
THE UNDETECTABLES… more than just a reality show… a hyper-reality show… bringing to life a world most people didn’t even realize was there….

Produced for Discovery Channel by FilmOasis, Inc. in association with Uncle Film+TV. The program’s executive producers are James McQuillan, Robert Goldberg and Eric Bonniot. For Discovery Channel, Tomi Landis is executive producer.

Here’s a sample episode but not my episode. I was on the episode “Saving Dad,” Wednesday, July 27 at 4:00 PM ET/PT. Dad had leukemia. He had a wife and kids. Their house needed repairs because of his weakened immune system. I was there as a squirrel expert.

The Unetectables Experts



Stills from the episode







THE UNDETECTABLES

"We're here to save you from your home"

Saving Dad

Wayne Smith wants to come home, but he can't... yet...

Wayne, the father of four, was recently diagnosed with leukemia.

That's why the Smiths called in THE UNDETECTABLES. For someone with a compromised immune system, any bacterial infection can be life-threatening.

After days of chemotherapy, Wayne is scheduled to return home from the hospital soon, but what will he find there? From campylobacter in the water to salmonella in the food to mold spores on the ceiling--all can be dangerous, even deadly. And Wayne and Sally Smith's house is always overflowing with activity. It's packed with four teenagers, four cats, a snake, and a domesticated squirrel called Chip, who loves chocolate. On top of all that, the roof is falling apart, and flocks of birds are nesting in the attic. Wayne and his family clearly need the help of THE UNDETECTABLES.

For the Smith family, the stakes couldn't be higher...

Says Sally Smith: "Wayne has no immune system right now. Basically, if he gets a cold or even if he gets a cough - - it's his body that's dangerous to him. 'Cause we're fighting things constantly in our body that his body can't fight off now, because there's no immunities. So, and yeah there's things in here that he's breathing that like you or I would get the sniffles or something. It could potentially put him in the hospital."

For THE UNDETECTABLES, it would be a challenge unlike any other. Says Dr. Marc Reidl, team allergist and immunologist: "The stakes are definitely high. We want to do everything we can to help Wayne. We've got to get in there and find out if there's anything that might be a threat to him."

Over an intense, week-long investigation, the team would subject the house to an eye-popping variety of tests... from infra-red thermal scanning to air sampling to microbiological analysis.

And as the test results came back, there was some alarming news...

It would definitely turn out to be a job for THE UNDETECTABLES...

http://web.archive.org/web/20080219064504/http://www.theundetectables.com/episodes/104.html

Episode Four - Saving Dad

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Wildlife rehab services provided by MARY CUMMINS

104— Saving Dad. A life-changing event has brought THE UNDETECTABLES to the Smith home. Sally's Smith's husband Wayne has been diagnosed with cancer. The chemotherapy treatments for his leukemia is destroying his immune system. Any bacterial infection, even the common cold, could be life-threatening. From campylobacter in the water to salmonella in the food to mold spores on the ceiling--all can be dangerous, even deadly. Wayne is scheduled to return home from the hospital soon, but the Smith house is potential minefield. In a home packed with four teenagers, four cats, a snake, and a domesticated squirrel called Chip—not to mention a roof that's falling apart with birds nesting in the attic--Wayne and his family clearly need help. THE UNDETECTABLES have to find out what's plaguing the Smiths' house and make it safe for Wayne's return.

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDAMary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit