Mary Cummins Animal Advocates Los Angeles California Wildlife Rehabilitation Real Estate

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Captain Albert Torres dies of heart attack after working Saddle Ridge fire. He helped us rescue wildlife from the park

Captain Albert Torres, los angeles, park range, griffith park, california, cheryle torres, tip, death, died, saddle ridge, fire, october 12 2019, heart attack, coyote, owl, wildlife, wild animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, mary cummins, animal advocates, albert eddie torres, albert edward torres

68 year old Captain Albert Edward Torres of Duarte, California died of a heart attack after working the Saddle Ridge fire in Los Angeles, California. He used to help us rescue ill, injured and orphaned wildlife from Griffith Park. He helped us rescue bald mangy coyotes and other wildlife. Such a loss for the parks and our wildlife. RIP November 8, 1951 - October 12, 2019. He is survived by his wife Cheryl. Albert was a Senior Park Ranger II and an avid bird watcher.

Captain Albert Torres, los angeles, park range, griffith park, california, cheryle torres, tip, death, died, saddle ridge, fire, october 12 2019, heart attack, coyote, owl, wildlife, wild animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, mary cummins, animal advocates, albert eddie torres, albert edward torres


"A Los Angeles City park ranger who was working during the Saddle Ridge fire has died.

Capt. Albert Torres was patrolling the San Fernando city parks affected by the fire on Friday. Later, Torres said he wasn’t feeling well and collapsed.

He was taken to the hospital and died of a heart attack early Saturday morning.

LA Park Ranger Chief Joe Losorelli says it is unclear if Torres’ death is connected to the fires.

Torres had been with the LA City Park Rangers for about 40 years."

He is survived by his wife Cheryl Torres and children, Brian and Liz Marie. They'd been married since 1991.

Captain Albert Torres, los angeles, park range, griffith park, california, cheryle torres, tip, death, died, saddle ridge, fire, october 12 2019, heart attack, coyote, owl, wildlife, wild animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, mary cummins, animal advocates
Captain Albert Torres, los angeles, park range, griffith park, california, cheryle torres, tip, death, died, saddle ridge, fire, october 12 2019, heart attack, coyote, owl, wildlife, wild animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, mary cummins, animal advocates

Captain Albert Torres, los angeles, park range, griffith park, california, cheryle torres, tip, death, died, saddle ridge, fire, october 12 2019, heart attack, coyote, owl, wildlife, wild animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, mary cummins, animal advocates, albert edward torres, albert eddie torres


https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2019/10/13/40-year-employee-of-la-city-park-rangers-dies-of-heart-attack-after-working-saddle-ridge-fire


Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Friday, October 4, 2019

1,700+ mountain lions killed in California with depredation permits last 18 years. Only 4,000 left. Spending millions on a wildlife crossing may be moot

california department of fish wildlife, game, fish & game, depredation permits, mountain lions, california, killed, shot, murdered, wildlife crossing, hit by cars, freeways, mary cummins, animal advocates
The California Department of Fish & Wildlife gave depredation permits to people in California who killed 1,702 mountain lions from 2001 to 2018. California's statewide lion population is estimated to be approximately 4,000 animals and dropping. 42% were killed with depredation permits alone in the last 17 years. The number killed being hit by cars is minuscule compared to these numbers. It almost seems ridiculous to spend millions on a wildlife crossing over the 118 freeway to save five mountain lions when 1,700+ will be killed with depredation permits. Why not focus more energy to limit the depredation permits which are unnecessary anyway?

A person can apply for a depredation permit if a mountain lion has killed or injured their livestock. Killing a mountain lion will not prevent other mountain lions or other animals from killing other animals. It clearly makes more sense to protect your livestock with bars and enclosures. They should make it mandatory to protect your livestock. In actuality someone who leaves their livestock unprotected is creating the problem. The chart and numbers are of the least amount of mountain lion killed. The actual numbers are higher.

https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=171192&inline&fbclid=IwAR2EJv38R2h8D0fZvtH6xvdJ9IufLJJi22Havj4l4CB4YabzJ7Y8o2DsZg0

"Pursuant to California Fish and Game Code Section 4802 (et. Seq.), the Department of Fish and Wildlife shall, upon request, issue (depredation) permits to individuals reporting livestock loss or damage caused by mountain lions, if the loss or damage is confirmed by CDFW staff to have been caused by mountain lions."

https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Mammals/Mountain-Lion/Depredation

In 2017 they modified the depredation permit. The person must first do everything possible to protect their livestock. If that's the case, they should never give a depredation permit. This is the process to currently get a depredation permit for a mountain lion from the link below.

"GUIDANCE FOR MOUNTAIN LION INCIDENTS

Receiving reports of Mountain Lion Sightings, Depredation, Potential Human
Conflict, or Public Safety Situations (for non-sensitive populations refer to
Department Bulletin 2013-02)

STEPWISE PROCESS FOR MOUNTAIN LION INCIDENTS IN THE
IMPLEMENTATION AREAS

1) First Depredation Event
a. Confirmation of depredation. Per Fish and Game Code section 4803, a
mountain lion depredation must be verified by a responder.
b. Oral authorization. Per Fish and Game Code Section 4805, oral
authorization to pursue (haze) the depredating mountain lion may be
granted if the immediate pursuit will assist in the non-lethal removal of the
mountain lion from the property. A depredation permit shall be issued as
soon as practical.
c. Education. The responder should discuss site-specific options for
managing mountain lion depredation with the RP and educate the RP
regarding mountain lion behavior. Additionally, the responder should
communicate that as a condition of any depredation permit, the property
owner should institute logistically and economically feasible measures
designed to reduce the potential for attracting mountain lions. Potential
measures include, but are not limited to: 1) removing the carcass and
carcass parts of depredated animals; 2) install/repair/replace fencing or
other shelter designed to exclude mountain lions from the attractant; 3)
removing potential suitable habitat (e.g., cover) from the immediate vicinity
by clearing brush or removing lower limbs from shrubbery.
d. RP requests a permit. If the RP requests a depredation permit, the
Department shall issue a permit. The Department should issue a ‘nonlethal’ depredation permit to pursue/haze the mountain lion. Measures that
could be part of a permit include, but are not limited to: 1) deploying
temporary deterrent systems (e.g., motion-sensitive lighting, loud music),
and 2) the use of livestock protection dogs, etc. Such permits shall explicitly
indicate that no mountain lion shall be intentionally killed during this phase
of the permitting process. Unique characteristics or specific collar/tag
information on suspected lions shall be noted and monitored by the
Department when possible.

2) Second depredation event. If a mountain lion depredation is reported at the
same physical location (e.g. reported on animals owned by the same RP within
the same geographic ownership or area) within a time period strongly
suggesting a lion’s affinity for the site, the Department will confirm the reported
mountain lion depredation, and issue, if necessary, oral authorization in
accordance with Sections 1(a) and (b) above.
a. RP requests a permit. If damage is confirmed, and the property owner has
demonstrated that all reasonable preventative measures recommended by
the Department were implemented, the responder should modify the
existing permit or issue a new non-lethal depredation permit specifying
additional measures not included in the previous permit (e.g., use of beanbag shots). Such permits shall explicitly indicate that no mountain lion shall
be intentionally killed during pursuit.

3) Third depredation event. If a mountain lion depredation is reported a third
time at the same physical location (e.g. reported on animals owned by the
same RP within the same geographic ownership or area) within a time period
strongly suggesting a lion’s affinity for the site, the responder will first verify the
reported mountain lion depredation in accordance with Section 1(a) above.
a. RP requests a permit. If damage is confirmed by the Department, the RP
has demonstrated that all reasonable preventative measures required in
the existing permits were implemented, and the RP requests a lethal
depredation permit, the Department shall issue a depredation permit to
lethally remove the mountain lion. This permit could be via oral
authorization per Fish and Game Code Section 4805.
4) Terms and conditions of mountain lion depredation permits. Only one
mountain lion may be killed under a depredation permit. In order to ensure that
only the depredating lion will be taken, the permit shall: (1) expire 10 days after
issuance; (2) authorize the permittee to begin pursuit of the depredating
mountain lion not more than one mile from the depredation site; and, (3) limit
the pursuit of the depredating mountain lion to within a 10-mile radius from the
location of the reported damage or destruction. If damage continues to occur
following the killing of a mountain lion under a permit, the Department may
issue an additional depredation permit, o"

https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=153021

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.


Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit